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Gallery Interview
A conversation with Zoe Fisher
Gallery Interview
A conversation with Zoe Fisher
Zoe Fisher is an art student turned gallerist whose first space was born out of an undergraduate thesis project that imagined an alternative art space. Since then, she’s run a DIY artist-run space, a traditional white cube gallery, and is now curating and working with artists independently. We spoke with Zoe about the artists she has in her living room right now, blurring the lines between art and design, and how she’s thinking about curating and building community in a post-pandemic world.
Caitlin MacBride's Peripheral Vision (2018) hanging in Zoe's living room.
“I have a secret obsession with buying green paintings ever since someone told me ‘green paintings never sell.’”
Caitlin MacBride, Jean and Jane, 2020, oil on panel, 24 x 18 inches (61 x 45.8 cm)
A packed opening at Fisher Parrish in 2017.
Maureen St. Vincent, Tic Toc, 2018, soft pastel on paper with artist-made frame and museum glass, 24 x 21 inches (61 x 53.3 cm)
“I’ve had the traditional white cube gallery (Fisher Parrish) and the DIY artist-run space that changed colors every exhibition (99¢ Plus). Perhaps this is my third wave –– a more fluid one. Whether in a park, in a friend’s home, online, or in another gallery, I’m freed up to think about curating exhibitions in a different way.”
Gustav Hamilton, Mirror to Mirror, 2019, glazed ceramic, 13 x 16 inches (33.1 x 40.7 cm)
Tricia Keightley, Untitled, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 34 inches (101.6 x 86.4 cm)
Zoe Fisher
Born in San Francisco, CA
Launched Zoe Fisher Projects in 2020
Ridgewood, NY
What is your greatest extravagance?
Probably shoes. I think they’re an important investment (outside of my investment in artwork). I got it from my mamma who has an insane collection –– all of them are pointy.
If not yourself, who would you be?
A dancer. I would love to have a more physical existence.
For what fault do you have the most toleration?
Disorganization and chaos mindset –– particularly for artists. It can be really fruitful for artists to live and breathe chaos. I don’t have that same tolerance for non-artists, though, because I’m neurotically organized myself.
Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
Brilliant and genius when I’m talking about artists. I’m a total cliché because I really do think all the artists I work with are such.
What do you most value in your friends?
Showing up when you need to show up. And I really value positivity.
Zoe Fisher
Born in San Francisco, CA
Launched Zoe Fisher Projects in 2020
Ridgewood, NY
Zoe Fisher is an art student turned gallerist whose first space was born out of an undergraduate thesis project that imagined an alternative art space. Since then, she’s run a DIY artist-run space, a traditional white cube gallery, and is now curating and working with artists independently. We spoke with Zoe about the artists she has in her living room right now, blurring the lines between art and design, and how she’s thinking about curating and building community in a post-pandemic world.
Caitlin MacBride's Peripheral Vision (2018) hanging in Zoe's living room.
“I have a secret obsession with buying green paintings ever since someone told me ‘green paintings never sell.’”
Caitlin MacBride, Jean and Jane, 2020, oil on panel, 24 x 18 inches (61 x 45.8 cm)
A packed opening at Fisher Parrish in 2017.
Maureen St. Vincent, Tic Toc, 2018, soft pastel on paper with artist-made frame and museum glass, 24 x 21 inches (61 x 53.3 cm)
“I’ve had the traditional white cube gallery (Fisher Parrish) and the DIY artist-run space that changed colors every exhibition (99¢ Plus). Perhaps this is my third wave –– a more fluid one. Whether in a park, in a friend’s home, online, or in another gallery, I’m freed up to think about curating exhibitions in a different way.”
Gustav Hamilton, Mirror to Mirror, 2019, glazed ceramic, 13 x 16 inches (33.1 x 40.7 cm)
Tricia Keightley, Untitled, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 34 inches (101.6 x 86.4 cm)
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